Say Oishii! 7 Different Ways to Say Delicious in Japanese!

Say Oishii! 7 Different Ways to Say Delicious in Japanese!

There are a lot of delicious foods in our country, Japan –we have many chances to say Oishii! But you might wonder if we have another way of saying Oishii… yes, we have so many ways to express how wonderful the food is! Here, I would introduce 7 words to say “delicious” in Japanese.



 

Say Oishii! 7 Different Ways to Say Delicious in Japanese!

 

1. Umai (うまい)

This is very casual but also is a very widely used word to say Oishii. It is more common for boys to use Umai. Since it is pretty casual, I would not recommend you to use this saying when eating with your boss or someone whom you should respect. Some talents on TV shows use Maiu (まいう~) –which is a kind of slang that changed the word order of Umai and make it sounds funnier. Although Umai sounds like a bit rude, I really like the expression. Every time I hear someone saying Umai (and/or Maiu), it is easier to know that the person really likes the dish. Why don’t you start using Umai next time you eat out with your friends? Be careful not to use it in front of your boss!

 

2. Bimi (美味)

Bimi is another word for Oishii but this is mostly used in written words. You can see the expression in commercials and/or flyers. For example, there is a ferry which is known as “美味なる船 (Bimi naru fune)” since it serves a lot of delicious and fresh food to their customers. Moreover, one sausage maker use “美味なるものには音がある (Bimi naru mono ni ha oto ga aru)” when they are advertising their products since when you eat the sausage, you can hear a very good sound! Like these, the word Bimi has a strong impact when it is used in a written form –I think that’s why a lot of companies use the expression in their ad and commercials. You can consider using Bimi in your ads next time you want to introduce some delicious food in Japan!

 

3. Zeppin (絶品)

Another Oishii word Zeppin is often used on TV and also in ads. The expression means that the thing is so wonderful (delicious) that everyone is impressed. So, when Japanese people hear the word “絶品グルメ (Zeppin gourmet)” we become interested! Furthermore, you can use Zeppin in both casual and formal situations. When you say this in a conversation, you could say “絶品ですね (Zeppin desu ne!)” and then, explain how it is wonderful. Especially in a formal situation, it seems to be important to say the reason why you think the dish and/or the drink is Zeppin. The next time you find the word Zeppin in front of restaurants, try it –the food should be delicious!

 

4. xx Aji (xx味)

It is common to say “上品な味ですね (Jouhin na aji desu ne)” or “深い味わいですね (Fukai ajiwai desu ne)” when Japanese people comment about their dishes. These expressions include the meaning Oishii and also explain how it is delicious. But it is not a good idea just to say “おいしい味ですね (Oishii aji desu ne)” or “甘い味ですね (Amai aji desu ne)” since it sounds too childish and too obvious. I would recommend you to wait until you are confident enough to use these expressions –before that, you can learn the way of saying these from your boss and/or grown-ups.

 

5. Hoppe ga ochiru (ほっぺが落ちる)

This is a traditional way of saying Oishii –but you might find it a bit strange. The origin of the expression varies depending on people. Some people say that it is from how your cheek looks when you eat a lot of delicious food. Others mention that the word came from how you feel when you eat a lot of delicious food –your body might feel a bit looser than usual. Anyway, although it is one of my favorite expressions saying Oishii, Hoppe ga ochiru is not widely used in Japan anymore. But if you like to watch and/or read Japanese traditional tales, I’m sure you’ll find this!

 

6. Kuse ni naru (癖になる)

I have seen a lot of people saying Kuse ni naru both on TV and in a real life. The expression originally means habit-forming –so when someone says this, he/she means that the food is so delicious that they would be addicted to it. Another saying for this is “Yamitsuki ni naru (病み付きになる)” and I feel that I hear the latter one more often in my daily life. The targeted dish/food for this expression usually tastes strong/thick and gives some impacts on people. Since this is much easier for anyone to use, you can try saying Kuse ni naru next time you find your favorite!

 

7. Saiko (最高)

I assume you might have heard this expression –meaning “This is the best!” Actually, Saiko is often used when people eat/drink wonderful food/drink. Especially when I drink with a group of people, I often hear Saiko after everyone finish the first glass of beer. In addition to Saiko, many girls tend to say “Siawase (幸せ)” meaning happy when they have amazing dish (often sweets). Saying Saiko when drinking makes you get tense and Saiko-food makes you even happier. Although this is widely used in casual situations, it is okay to say “Saiko desu” in front of your boss. Have delicious food and say Saiko the next time you have a party!

 

Conclusion

There are many ways to say delicious in Japanese and we tend to use different expressions depending on the situations –some of them are casual and others are used mainly for advertisement. It is interesting to pay attention to what people are going to say the next time you eat out or drink out in Japan!

 

Say Oishii! 7 Different Ways to Say Delicious in Japanese!

1. Umai (うまい)
2. Bimi (美味)
3. Zeppin (絶品)
4. xx Aji (xx味)
5. Hoppe ga ochiru (ほっぺが落ちる)
6. Kuse ni naru (癖になる)
7. Saiko (最高)