10 Proper Ways to Use “Daijobu” in Various Situations!

10 Proper Ways to Use "Daijobu" in Various Situations!

The ambiguity in languages is never more prominent in the Japanese language. One overused word is daijobu. The word daijobu literally means okay or fine in English but used for different meanings. To save you from the confusion, here are 10 proper ways to use the term in day to day Japanese conversation.



 

10 Proper Ways to Use “Daijobu” in Various Situations!

 

1. Daijobu desu

When affirming your physical condition after a nasty spill or fall say Daijobu desu. This literally translates to Yes, I am fine in a formal manner. The more casual way of saying I am fine in Japanese is simply daijobu. This is often used when with family and friends.

 

2. Daijobu desu ka?

To ask a person of his or her physical well-being after sickness or any incident that might have hurt him or her, say, Daijobu desu ka? This translates to – are you okay? Another way to ask for a person’s well-being is Ogenki desu ka? (How are you doing?)

 

3. Kitto daijobu dayo

When encouraging a person who’s at a disadvantageous or difficult circumstances we usually say “It will be okay.” In Japanese, this translates to Kitto daijobu dayo. Sometimes the mere word daijobu is recognized as a word of encouragement in certain context.

 

4. Sore wa daijobu desu

When confirming if the action is done the right way. Sore wa daijobu desu. This translates to that is ok. To ask if you are doing the action or deed the right way, you say, kore wa daijobu desu ka? In English this means am I doing ok? Or is this okay?

 

5. Ashita wa daijobu desu ka?

Confirming an appointment or date with someone for the next day or tomorrow in Japanese is Ashita wa daijobu desu ka? (Is tomorrow okay for you?) To ask if a certain appointment or calendar date is good, Kono hizuke de daijobu desu ka?

 

6. Sore wa/ kore o shiyo shite mo daijobudesu ka?

Asking permission to use a certain thing or object in a polite manner in Sore wa or kore o shiyo shite mo daijobu desu ka? In English, this translates to – is it okay to use that or this? Pointing to the object. Sometimes just daijobu(?) is enough to ask permission.

 

7. Onegaishitemo daijobudesu ka?

Daijobudesu ka? Is a versatile question and this includes when requesting for something or asking if requesting such is ok or fine. The polite way to request for something in Japanese is onegaishitemo daijobudesu ka? Which means – is it okay to request for ~?

 

8. Daijobu desu, shinpai naiyo

To acknowledge something in Japanese such as if someone ask permission if doing something is not bothersome, there’s no need to worry, the correct term is daijobu desu, shinpai arimasen. This means – it’s ok, don’t worry. A less formal term is daijobu, sinpai naiyo.

 

9. Daijobu

Like it’s English counterpart, ok, daijobu is used in different context such as when replying to someone whilst listening to what they are saying or explaining. You say okay or daijobu in Japanese in response or to acknowledge you are listening.

 

10. Kekkou desu or Daijobu desu

The polite term for refusing something in Japanese is kekkou desu (no, thank you). But in some instances such as in restaurants, the term daijobu desu is used when asked by the waiter if you care for more water or drinks. This is quite confusing to some foreigners and non-Japanese speakers.

 

Conclusion

Versatile terms in Japanese such as daijobu are used in everyday conversations. And the meaning depends on the context it’s being used for. The term can mean both yes or no such as in cases when in a restaurant. Know the difference by studying the language and the culture to make sense on some terms that are vague, get the gist on how and why it used in certain situations as you immerse into the Japanese culture.

 

10 Proper Ways to Use “Daijobu” in Various Situations!

1. Daijobu desu

2. Daijobu desu ka?

3. Kitto daijobu dayo

4. Sore wa daijobu desu

5. Ashita wa daijobu desu ka?

6. Sore wa/ kore o shiyo shite mo daijobudesu ka?

7. Onegaishitemo daijobudesu ka?

8. Daijobu desu, shinpai naiyo

9. Daijobu

10. Kekkou desu or Daijobu desu