6 Facts Why Japanese Guys Like Girls Who Cook Nikujaga Well

6 Facts Why Japanese Guys Like Girls Who Cook Nikujaga Well

Sushi is great, tempura is wonderful, but it is the dish that is served at home that grabs the heart of Japanese. One of those dishes is definitely “nikujaga.” It is a very simple food made from sliced “niku” (meat) and “jagaimo” (potatoes) seasoned with soy sauce, sake and sugar (the easy-to-make recipe is at the end). For many Japanese, this is “ofukuro-no-aji” meaning “mama’s flavor” and is taught usually at home from moms to daughters. As quotes say, “The way to a man’s heart is from his stomach,” we Japanese are no exception. Japanese guys tend to fall for girls who cook “nikujaga” well. I have made a little analysis why guys fall so easily with this taste.



 

6 Facts Why Japanese Guys Like Girls Who Cook Nikujaga Well

 

1. “Ofukuro-no-aji” – Men love their mama!

As mentioned above, “nikujaga” is considered “mama’s flavor.” It is seasoned with the basic Japanese seasonings such as soy sauce, sake, and sugar. Kids love it because the ingredients are kids’ favorites – potatoes, slices of meat, and the flavor of browned onions. When men grow up to be adults, this is the dish that brings them back the good old days at home. So when a girl cooks “nikujaga” well, he feels as if he came back home to his mommy’s arms.

 

2. “She must be a good cook” assumption

“Nikujaga” is not a fancy dish, but is an everyday dish. Since it only uses a few basic seasonings, it signifies that she is a good cook if she can season it well. Japanese guys love to drink out, but when at home, they like to be served a good home dinner. Thus if the girl is a good cook, most likely that she will serve a great dinner at home every night. This is a dream come true for many Japanese guys.

 

3. A hope that “She will manage the household finance well”

In Japan, the family finance is usually in the hands of women. A girl who has a sense of finance is considered that she will help the future husband. A good sense of finance includes cooking well with healthy but inexpensive ingredients. Knowing how to cook “nikujaga,” the typical home made food, indirectly means that the girl can think about the family finance and does not overspend.

 

4. The qualification of a good housewife

The top 3 qualifications of a good housewife in Japan are; 1) a good cook, 2) clean and tidy, 3) has a balanced sense of finance. Two of these qualifications are covered when she can cook “nikujaga” well. Japanese men fantasize the future wife waiting for him at home with an apron and a well-cooked “nikujaga” in a clean home.

 

5. An expectation as a mom for the next generation

We’ve seen that “nikujaga” is a symbol for home sweet home, as mama’s flavor and as a qualification of a good housewife. So, it is now the time to hand this precious dish to the next generation. For sons, it will be their mama’s flavor, and for daughters, it will be the dish to learn to be the next good housewife.

 

6. Where can I as a foreigner eat “nikujaga?”

Although “nikujaga” is a home-cooked dish, it is now served at many izakaya (Japanese style bars) and teishoku-ya (economical restaurants). You can try it there, or cook at home since it is usually cooked at home. Here is a very easy recipe. Brown sliced onions with sliced meat (pork or beef), and add square cut potatoes and carrots. When the potatoes start to look clearer, add water until the ingredients are covered. Season with soy sauce, mirin (if available), sugar, and sake (can be substituted by white wine). Keep the fire low until everything is cooked well. Voila! Here is your “nikujaga” served at your home!

 

Conclusion

If you have any plans to marry a Japanese man, start cooking this dish to get his heart instead of ordering sushi. However, don’t worry if you can’t master it. Nowadays some Japanese men cook better than girls. In this case, just sit down at the table and wait to be served just like at home!

 

6 Facts Why Japanese Guys Like Girls Who Cook Nikujaga Well

1. “Ofukuro-no-aji” – Men love their mama!
2. “She must be a good cook” assumption
3. A hope that “She will manage the household finance well”
4. The qualification of a good housewife
5. An expectation as a mom for the next generation
6. Where can I as a foreigner eat “nikujaga?”