7 Useful Tips to Enjoy Tokyo Skytree Like Japanese!

7 Useful Tips to Enjoy Tokyo Skytree Like Japanese!

The 634m high Tokyo Skytree has become the city’s top tourist attraction since it opened in 2012, and is the world’s tallest free-standing broadcast tower. But it’s not just the amazing architectural accomplishment that makes Skytree so popular, but that it towers above a sprawling entertainment area known as Skytree Town. This complex has a wide variety of attractions, including over 300 shops and restaurants, an aquarium and a planetarium.



 

7 Useful Tips to Enjoy Tokyo Skytree Like Japanese!

 

1. Getting There

Reaching Tokyo Skytree from other parts of the city is easy. The two closest stations are Oshiage Station (Tokyo Metro Hanzomon Line or Toei Asakusa Line), and TOKYO SKYTREE Station (Tobu Skytree Line). There’s also a direct route from Oshiage Station to Narita airport on the SKY ACCESS Line, and a route to Haneda airport with a change at Sengakuji station. There are several fixed-route buses that tour Ueno, Asakusa and Tokyo Skytree which are convenient for tourists and cheap. Operators also offer information pamphlets, discount tickets and coupons for attractions in these areas.

 

2. Avoid the Queues

As you can imagine, Tokyo Skytree is very busy on holidays and at weekends, so avoid those times if you can. You can buy time and date assigned tickets for Skytree on-line, though the site is in Japanese only, so many overseas visitors do this through a travel agent. However, Fast Skytree Tickets can be purchased at an exclusive ticket counter on the 4th floor, and grant immediate admission for international visitors who can show their passport, or other ID, as well as any Japanese people accompanying them. They’re a little more expensive than regular day tickets, but you don’t have to wait in line.

 

3. Getting High

At a stomach-churning 350m above the ground, the Tokyo Skytree Tembo Deck (floor 350), with its huge 5 meter-high window, offers a thrilling 360-degree panoramic view of up to 70km distance. Not high enough? Then take the glass tube up from here to the Tokyo Skytree Tembou Galleria (floor 445), 450m above the ground!

 

4. Munchies?

While you’re up there on Tembou Deck, you may as well see if you can keep some food and drink down. On floor 340 you’ll find Skytree Cafe offering drinks, snacks and original sweets, while the Sky Restaurant on floor 345 offers fine “Tokyo Cuisine” dining with a panoramic view. At a mere 150m above the ground, Solamachi Dining SKYTREE VIEW restaurants complex on floors 30 and 31 offers spectacular close up views of the tower. For more down-to-Earth eating, there are dozens of cafe’s, restaurants and food shops on the lower floors (1-7).

 

5. Shopping

On floor 345, you’ll find The Skytree Shop and a range of souvenir goods, but there’s an even larger one all the way down on floor 1 for which you don’t need an observation deck ticket. There are even more Japan themed gift and souvenir shops on floor 4. In fact, floors 1-5 are full of shops selling everything from fashion goods to traditional foods. But the most interesting shopping experience will be found in the distinctive floor 1 arcades known as Station Street, and Solamachi Shotengai Shopping District.

 

6. For the Young at Heart

Floor 5 is home to the Sumida Aquarium with its impressive display of marine creatures. The penguins and seals are a particularly popular attraction. And if space is your thing, the Planetarium “TENKU” can be found on floor 7. Tree Village on floor 4 is a must for fans of anime characters. Okay, we’re back to shopping again, but Tree Village features many of the best-loved characters, like Doraemon, Gudetama and Pokemon in a range of merchandise, from soft toys to T-shirts. These uniquely Japanese items would make good souvenirs for friends and family back home.

 

7. River Walk

Now, if you really need to come down to Earth again, why not take a stroll along the banks of the Sumida river? It’s a great way to explore the area and see its famous landmarks. A lot of people come here for the illuminated Sakura (cherry blossoms) during the last week of March and the first week of April, or for the Sumida River Fireworks Festival (late July). Visitors can also take cruises on the river.

 

Conclusion

I think you’ll agree, Tokyo Skytree is much more than just an overgrown antenna erected as torture for acrophobics, it’s torture for chrometophobics too! But seriously, if like me, you fear neither heights, nor spending money, you’ll definitely want to add Tokyo Skytree to your tour itinerary.

 

7 Useful Tips to Enjoy Tokyo Skytree Like Japanese!

1. Getting There
2. Avoid the Queues
3. Getting High
4. Munchies?
5. Shopping
6. For the Young at Heart
7. River Walk