7 Useful Tips about Japan Typhoon!

7 Useful Tips about Japan Typhoon!

In 1274, Kubla Khan’s Mongol army landed at Hakata Bay in Kyushu, only to be defeated by the Samurai. Seven years later, Khan tried again bringing a force of 140,00 warriors but a powerful typhoon, the kamikaze (divine wind) of legend, thwarted him. This marked the end of the Mongol empire, but it wasn’t the end of the typhoons that have battered Japan throughout its history. If you’re going to be in Japan for any length of time, it’s highly likely you’ll experience a typhoon or two, so here are a few pointers to surviving them.



 

7 Useful Tips about Japan Typhoon!

 

1. Follow the Weather Reports

Fortunately, the Japan metrological agency tracks each new typhoon as it forms in the Pacific so weather updates and advisories are the best way of knowing where they are, how fast they’re travelling, how strong they are and when they are expected to arrive. Japan tends to be rather prone to natural disasters, so foreign residents should make finding English language news broadcasts a priority.

 

2. Stay Indoors

Even a moderate typhoon’s wind can knock you off your feet, whilst flying debris (tree branches, roof tiles, unsecured balcony furniture, etc.) can also be hazardous. You’ll have ample time to make preparations before the typhoon hits, but once it does, it’s best not to go out.

 

3. Be Prepared

As you’re likely to be stuck indoors for a while, make sure you have plenty of food and drink in store. Canned and dry goods are particularly important in case gas and electric supplies are cut and you can’t cook anything. This might be a good time to hire all the Star Wars films… you’ll probably have time to watch them all! In short, hunker down and wait for the typhoon to pass.

 

4. Lock Down

Before you hunker down, make sure to bring plants and other items in off your balcony, if you have one. You’d be surprised what a high wind can lift and send flying, so don’t take any chances. You may also be liable for any damage or injury caused by anything you failed to secure, so be thorough in this.

 

5. Windows

Most windows in Japan are made from shatter-proof glass, but it can still be quite worrying when the wind hits and it seems like your windows might blow in at any moment. If yours have shutters, as many houses do in Japan, close them, or criss-cross duct tape over the window panes to be on the safe side. At the very least, draw the curtains closed.

 

6. Power & Water

Realise that very strong typhoons can be incredibly destructive and, apart from causing damage to property and personal injury, they can disrupt power and water supplies. Make sure your mobile devices and laptops are fully charged, and run a bathtub of cold water just in case the water supply is out for any length of time. Some people keep PET bottles of frozen water in their freezers and which can be put into the fridge to keep food cool when the electricity is off.

 

7. Flooding & Landslides

Typhoons are not just strong winds; they also bring a lot of rainfall and it is often this that causes the most damage and even loss of life. If you live close to open water, hillsides or mountains, be especially aware of flood warnings and potential landslides as these can be far more deadly than the high winds.

 

Conclusion

In general, most typhoons are nowhere near as scary as I may have suggested, but it’s best to be prepared, especially if you’re living in the south of the country where typhoons tend to make landfall at their strongest. Those that do reach as far as Tokyo are rarely as strong, whilst many just blow themselves out or move on to terrorize the Chinese. For me personally, it is the hot humid air that typhoons suck in after them that is the most unpleasant effect. But wherever you reside, if you’re in the path of a typhoon, take care and listen closely to the warnings. Good luck.

 

7 Useful Tips about Japan Typhoon!

1. Follow the Weather Reports
2. Stay Indoors
3. Be Prepared
4. Lock Down
5. Windows
6. Power & Water
7. Flooding & Landslides