7 Things about Kimono Nobody Told you!

7 Things about Kimono Nobody Told you!

Kimono is a traditional Japanese clothing. Japanese people, now, wear mostly Western style clothes, yet they still wear kimono for special occasions. When tourists visit Japan, they often admire beautiful patterns and color of kimono. Many of them try it out during their stay. Most traditional hotels in Japan provide simple kimono for guest to wear inside the building. Some of them even consider of purchasing one to bring back to their country. If you are thinking of wearing kimono in Japan, whether to go out for a dinner or for watching kabuki, it would be important to know different types of kimono that exist in Japan. In fact, there are formal and casual kimonos that we wear for different occasions. I will explain, in this article, the difference of each type of kimono and when it is appropriate to wear.



 

7 Things about Kimono Nobody Told you!

 

1. Kuro tomesode

7 Things about Kimono Nobody Told you!_kuro tomesode

Tomesode is a type of kimono for married women. This is equivalent of formal dress in Western countries. It only has patterns under the waistline. It has shorter sleeves, which is a sign that whoever wear it is married. During the Edo period, married women shortened the sleeve once they are married in order to facilitate doing housework.Kuro tomesode is a tomesode in black color. In most cases, married female relatives to the bride or to the groom wear this kimono in a wedding. There are three or five family crests on it.

 

2. Iro tomesode

7 Things about Kimono Nobody Told you!_iro tomesode

Since it is tomesode, it’s formal kimono that women wear for formal occasions like a wedding. Unlike kuro tomesome, it has a lighter color. Other than that, it also has shorter sleeves, patterns only under the waistline and family crest.In a wedding, married women who are not the relatives to the bride and the groom wear this kimono. In the past recent years, unmarried women who reach certain age (mid-30s) wear this kimono as well. It is to show a sign of maturity.

 

3. Furisode

7 Things about Kimono Nobody Told you!_furisode

Furisode is a kimono for young, unmarried women. It is also formal kimono that young women wear for formal occasions, such as weddings or graduation ceremonies. Contrary to tomesode, it has longer sleeves and patterns all over the kimono.In 1500s, middle or upper class boys also wore furisode. Back then, boys and girls wore basically the same clothes until they become adult. They also wore it at home. In Edo period, on the other hand, it became formal clothes. Longer the sleeves are better during this period.

 

4. Homongi

7 Things about Kimono Nobody Told you!_homongi

The name ‘homongi’ literally means ‘visiting wear’ in Japanese. This is formal kimono for both married and unmarried women. You can wear it for formal occasions like a wedding. It is also appropriate to wear to other types of formal parties and to formal tea ceremonies. There are colorful patterns over the seams.Homongi was created in Meiji period, as a visiting dress without too much formality. Therefore there is no family crest on this kimono.

 

5. Tsukesage

7 Things about Kimono Nobody Told you!_tsukesage

Tsukesage is also formal kimono, which is slightly less formal than homongi. Thus it has simpler patterns. As well as you can wear it for formal occasions, you can also wear it for less formal occasions, such as informal tea ceremonies, Kabuki Theater or dinner at hotel restaurant.Tsukesage was created during the Pacific War in the World War II, when decorated homongi was prohibited. It was during this period that it has become simplified formal wear.

 

6. Komon

7 Things about Kimono Nobody Told you!_komon

Komon is casual kimono that is not appropriate for formal occasions. Patterns are evenly spread over the kimono.Its patterns are created during the Edo period. In this period, daimyo (lords) were in competition on who has the more elaborated kamishimo – kimono for samorai and daimyo. When the Edo feudal government prohibited extravagant kimono for daimyo, they have created the pattern that looks like mono pattern from far away, but visible from closer look. This pattern became the famous “Edo Komon” which influenced common people to imitate.

 

7. Yukata

7 Things about Kimono Nobody Told you!_yukata

Yukata is popular kimono for summer. Made in cotton, light fabric of the kimono is perfect for hot summer. It’s a favorite kimono of Japanese girls for attending summer festivals or hanabi festivals. Many traditional hotels in Japan also provide a simplified type of yukata for guests to wear inside and around the hotel. Although it is possible to wear it outside, in proximity to the hotel, it won’t be appropriate to wear in a city.In 1600s, yukata used to be what people wore after taking a bath. During the Edo period, it has become a popular kimono among common people.

 

Conclusion

I hope you now understand different types of kimono that exist in Japan. If you are planning on wearing one, it would be better to choose the right kimono for the occasion. If you are mature woman, it would be better to choose kimono other than furisode, which would make you look immature. I hope you will enjoy wearing beautiful kimono in Japan.

 

7 Things about Kimono Nobody Told you!

1. Kuro tomesode
2. Iro tomesode
3. Furisode
4. Homongi
5. Tsukesage
6. Komon
7. Yukata