10 Other Ways to Say Ganbatte!

10 Other Ways to Say Ganbatte!

I am native Japanese but I moved to the United States (Tallahassee, FL) in 1999. When I was living in Japan and even more since I moved to US, I have a lot of friends who are native English speakers. I’ve been asked many times about what Japanese people are like, about the Japanese language and how we express things. Today, I’m going to talk about how we cheer others by using words other than “Ganbatte”. You may already know the meaning of “Ganbatte”, but just in case let me translate. It means “Good luck!”, “Cheer up!” and so on.



 

10 Other Ways to Say Ganbatte!

 

1. Ganbatte kudasai

Unlike “Ganbatte”, just by adding this one word “kudasai”, you can use this phrase for business or formal circumstances. “Ganbatte kudasai” is a polite version of Ganbatte.
(*”Kudasai” means “please” in English. It is frequently used with many other words. It is very convenient and a very good word to remember!)

 

2. Fight

This is commonly used between close friends in casual / informal situations. Even though this is an English word, Japanese people use it for when a friend is feeling down or weak or trying to achieve/overcome something. By saying “Fight” one gives strength and the encouragement. The way Japanese pronounce this word is a bit different from your way, the “t” in the end sounds like the word “toe”, so it would be like fightoe.

 

3. “Oen Shimasu” / “Oen Suruyo” / “Oen Shiteruyo”

The word “Oen” means “cheer” or “support you” in English. “Oen Shimasu” is a polite way of saying it. A friendly way of saying this is “Oen Suruyo”. “Oen Shiteruyo” is also friendly / casual way and this means you are currently or will be cheering for others.

 

4. Ike!

This means “Go!” in English. This expression is often used at sporting events for cheering.

 

5. “Daijobu?” / “Daijoubu desu” / “Daijobu dayo”

Means “Are you OK?” / “You’re OK” / “No problem!” / “No need to worry”.When someone is worried or nervous, these words express that you care and want to encourage or calm/ease the person you want to cheer up.

 

6. “Genki Dashite” / “Genki Dashite Kudasai”

You can use these phrases when someone seems sad, depressed or disappointed. The meanings are “Chin up!” or “(Please) keep up your spirits!” The word “Genki” means “Cheerful” or “High-spirited”.

 

7. “Anshin Shitene” / “Anshin Shite Kudasai”

The word “Anshin” means “relief”, “stop worrying” or “be confident”. So, when you want to ease someone’s mind or help relax and encourage, these phrases are very thoughtful and effective.

 

8. “Egao Egao!” / “Waratte!”

These are appropriate to use between close friends. They are very cheerful expressions. The word “Egao” means “Smile” and by repeating the word makes it brighten the mood (but you can just say it once as well.) “Waratte” means “Smile for me”.

 

9. “Ki ni Surukoto Nai yo” / “Ki ni Surukoto Nai desu”

Means “No need to worry”, “You don’t have to consider it” or “It’s not your fault / responsibility”. When your friend is too stressed or depressed by something, it will ease the mind of your friend by you saying those kind and helpful words.

 

10. “Itsumo Issho (dayo)”

Means “I’m always with you”. When your friend is feeling lonely or seems lost, this phrase is very warm and deeply cheerful!

 

Conclusion

Keeping those phrases in your mind is highly recommended. Just like your own language (English), those cheering words have very powerful and thoughtful meanings. Sometimes, we are not very good at expressing our true minds. However, Japanese people are very appreciative of kindness. Therefore, if you could use those cheerful words when they are needed most, that will open the door and you might possibly make a Japanese best friend. WISH YOU LUCK!!!

 

10 Other Ways to Say Ganbatte!

1. Ganbatte kudasai
2. Fight
3. “Oen Shimasu” / “Oen Suruyo” / “Oen Shiteruyo”
4. Ike!
5. “Daijobu?” / “Daijoubu desu” / “Daijobu dayo”
6. “Genki Dashite” / “Genki Dashite Kudasai”
7. “Anshin Shitene” / “Anshin Shite Kudasai”
8. “Egao Egao!” / “Waratte!”
9. “Ki ni Surukoto Nai yo” / “Ki ni Surukoto Nai desu”
10. “Itsumo Issho (dayo)”