How to use 15 Girly Japanese Slangs!

How to use 15 Girly Japanese Slangs!

Although I am a Japanese girl, it’s hard to know all the Japanese slangs used by girls since I don’t currently live in Japan. In fact, slangs change very rapidly in Japan. Each year, new slangs are created and old ones become obsolete. Therefore it was very difficult for me to choose which slangs to include in the list. I have chosen some popular girly slangs that commonly used for many years. In addition, I have also chosen some new slangs that are popular right now, in the year 2015.



 

How to use 15 Girly Japanese Slangs!

 

1. Uchi (I, me)

We usually address ourselves as “watashi,” which means “I” or “me” in Japanese. Many Japanese girls, however, address themselves as “uchi” in familiar situations, such as when they are talking with friends. If you are taking to a friend about what you are going to do together, for example, you can say;Friend : Shibuya ikitai (I want to go to Shibuya)You: Uchi mo! (Me too) “Uchi” can be used as “my” in conversation as well;Friend : Uchi no oya, kinou gakkou kite saa (My parents came to school yesterday)You: Majide! Uchi no wa konakute yokattaa (Really?! Good thing that my parents didn’t come)

 

2. Kimoi (disgusting, gross)

Normally we say “kimochiwarui” when something or someone is disgusting or gross. But many girls simply say “kimoi” instead. “Kimoi” is commonly used as an insult for describing people who are disgusting or weird. When you are talking with your friends, you can talk bad about someone using this word. Suppose you are talking about your classmate you don’t like, with your friend;Friend: Nee, kinou Tanaka ni hanashi kakeraretan dakedo (Tanaka talked to me yesterday)You: Majide! Kimoi! (Really! That’s gross)

 

3. Yabai (dangerous, oh my god)

When something or someone is dangerous, we usually say “abunai.” But many young girls use the term “yabai.” When you are in a dangerous neighborhood, you can say;You: Koko yabai yone (it looks dangerous here) You can also use it as “oh my god” in English;Friend: Jyugyou nanji? (What time is your class?)You: Jyuuji… Yabai! Chikoku suru! (It’s 10… Oh my god, I’m late!) At last, you can use this word positively. When something is extremely good, you can say;You: Koko no keeki yabai! (The cake in this store is too good!)

 

4. Uzai (annoying)

When someone is being annoying, many young Japanese girls call him/her “uzai.” It means someone is being annoying and you want him/her to go away. If a guy you don’t like is bugging you, you can say;You: Uzai dakedo (You are so annoying. Go away) When you are talking to your friend about the annoying teacher, you would say;Friend: Uchi no senkoo ga benkyo shiro tte urusain dakedo (My teacher tells me constantly to study hard)You: Honto uzai yone (That’s so annoying)

 

5. Ukeru (funny, ridiculous)

Normally we say “omoshiroi” when something is funny or someone said something hilarious. Many young girls, on the other hand, say “ukeru” for funny things with their friends. When your friend told you a funny story that one of the ugly teacher was on the date, for example, you can say;Friend: Kinou senko ga deeto shiteru toko michyattan dakedo (Yesterday I saw that teacher was on a date)You: Ukeru (That’s funny) Sometimes we use it to make fun of each other;Friend: Ah nooto wasureta! (Oh no! I forgot my notebook!)You: Ukeru (That’s so stupid)

 

6. Chou (Really)

When you exaggerate what you say, you usually use the words such as “really” or “so.” You would say, for example, “that’s so cute.” Even though we usually say “Hontou ni” in formal situations, many Japanese girls casually say “chou” instead. You can add “chou” to many adjectives;Chou kimoi (So disgusting)Chou ukeru (So funny)Chou kawaii (So cute)

 

7. Maji (Really)

“Maji” has the same meaning as “chou.” It also mean “really” in English. It’s possible to replace “chou” with “maji” in the earlier sentences. You can also use it to say “really” when you are surprised;Friend: Kinou kokuhaku sarechatta! (Someone told me he liked me yesterday!)You: Majide! (Really!)

 

8. Suggoku, Meccha (Really)

As I told you earlier, we say “chou” or “maji” when we want to say “really.” Many girls use those words when they are with friends. However those words make them sound vulgar. Since many girls don’t want their boyfriend to see them as vulgar and tasteless, they often use other prettier words, such as “Suggoku” or “Meccha,” to replace them. When you are on a date with your boyfriend, for example, you can say;Boyfriend: Keeki oishii? (Is the cake good?)You: Un, suggoku oishii! (Yeah it’s so good!) When your boyfriend asks you to go out, you can say;Boyfriend: Shumatsu ryokou ikanai? (What do you say if we go on a trip this weekend?)You: Meccha ikitai! (I really want to go!)

 

9. Hidoi (awful)

When someone is mean or offended us, we usually get angry. Many girls would want to start swearing, using the word like “uzai.” On the other hand, they also don’t want to sound vulgar in front of a guy they like. They have a good trick for that. They replace the word with “hidoi” which means “awful” in English. This word makes them sound sweeter and cuter. When your boyfriend cancelled a date at last minute, instead of getting angry, you can try this;Boyfriend: Gomen! Kyou tomodachi to nomi ni iku yakusoku ga arun da (Sorry. My friends asked me out for a drink tonight)You: Yakusoku shiteta noni! Hidoi (You promised that we go out tonight! That’s awful)

 

10. Ah-ne (I see, that’s what you mean)

When you want to show that you understand or you are listening, you would say “I see” or “I understand” in English. In Japanese, we usually say “hai,” which means “yes” in formal situations. Many young girls, on the other hand, say casually “Ah-ne” with their friends. It shows that you are listening about what others are saying. It also indicates that “that’s what you mean.”You: Anoko saikin tsukiai waruku nai? (She doesn’t hang out with us lately, don’t you think?)Friend: Atarashii kareshi ga dekitan datte yo (She started to go out with a new boyfriend)You: Ah-ne (I see)

 

 

11. Sorena (I see, that’s right)

“Sorena” is also the word young girls use when they want to show that they are listening to what others are saying. Although “Ah-ne” is principally applied when our friends give us new information, “Sorena” implies that we are simply agreeing with what they are saying. It’s also casually used by girls when they don’t have any particular things to say. It’s like saying “uh-huh” in English. You can casually respond what your friend is saying like this:Friend: Baito darui (I feel lazy to go to my part-time job today)You: Sorena (uh-huh)

 

12. Ichikita (Going home for a while)

“Ichikita” is one of the recent slangs that are used by Japanese school girls. It’s a short term for “Ichiji kitaku,” which means going home and coming back to school. Many girls use this expression to meet each other after going home first. When you are going out with your friend after school, you can say;You: Jyaa Ichikita shitekara shuugou ne (Let’s see each other later after going home first)

 

13. Ryo (Ok!)

“Ryo” is also a short term for “Ryokai” which means “I understand” or “Okay.” Instead of saying “OK,” which we also use it in Japanese, it sounds cooler to say “Ryo.” When you are confirming your friend about going to shopping, for example, you can say;Friend: Jyaa ashita 11 ji ni Harajyuku ne! (Tomorrow let’s meet at 11 o’clock at Harajuku)You: Ryo! (Ok!) 14) Mendy (I feel lazy)When we feel lazy to do what we have to do, we usually say “Mendokusai.” But many young girls use the word “Mendy” for that. This word comes from the name of a performer in a very popular group called Exile. When you feel lazy, use this word casually;Jyugyou Mendy (I feel lazy to go to class)Shukudai takusan aru. Mendy (I have so many homework today. I don’t want to do it)

 

14. Mendy (I feel lazy)

When we feel lazy to do what we have to do, we usually say “Mendokusai.” But many young girls use the word “Mendy” for that. This word comes from the name of a performer in a very popular group called Exile. When you feel lazy, use this word casually;Jyugyou Mendy (I feel lazy to go to class)Shukudai takusan aru. Mendy (I have so many homework today. I don’t want to do it)

 

15. Byou de (quickly)

It’s also one of the recent expressions that are used by Japanese young girls. When we or we want other to do something quickly, we usually say “hayaku.” Many Japanese girls, on the other hand, say “byou de” instead. In fact, “byou” means a second in Japanese. When you don’t feel like doing your homework that is due on the next day, you can say:Shukudai byou de owaraseru (I will finish this homework quickly) You can also use this expression when you want to ask your friend to do something quickly:You: Jyaa byou de nooto motte kite! (Bring the notebook quickly!)

 

Conclusion

There are so many girl slangs in Japanese which are not on this list. It’s quite normal that you don’t always understand completely what young girls say. Even some Japanese adults have some difficulties in deciphering what they are saying. The first 10 slangs that I have presented are the common slangs that most people know in Japan. The last 5 slangs, on the other hand, are more recent slangs that are actually popular right now. If you master those 5 slangs in addition to the first 10 basic slangs, you will be able to speak like cool Japanese girls.

 

How to use 15 Girly Japanese Slangs!

1. Uchi (I, me)
2. Kimoi (disgusting, gross)
3. Yabai (dangerous, oh my god)
4. Uzai (annoying)
5. Ukeru (funny, ridiculous)
6. Chou (Really)
7. Maji (Really)
8. Suggoku, Meccha (Really)
9. Hidoi (awful)
10. Ah-ne (I see, that’s what you mean)
11. Sorena (I see, that’s right)
12. Ichikita (Going home for a while)
13. Ryo (Ok!)
14. Mendy (I feel lazy)
15. Byou de (quickly)